Green Card for Asylees: Permanent Residency for those granted asylum in the United States

Geralt.    Pixabay   .  U.S. immigration law allows asylees to apply for lawful permanent resident (LPR) status after they have been physically present in the U.S. for at least one year since being granted asylum. Find out the other requirements and the process for asylees to obtain a green card in the United States.

Geralt. Pixabay. U.S. immigration law allows asylees to apply for lawful permanent resident (LPR) status after they have been physically present in the U.S. for at least one year since being granted asylum. Find out the other requirements and the process for asylees to obtain a green card in the United States.

I have been granted asylum in the United States. Am I eligible to apply for permanent residency in the United States?

Yes. In order to be eligible for a Green Card as an asylee, you must meet the following requirements:

  • You are physically present in the United States at the time you file your Form I-485;

  • You have been physically present in the United States for at least one year after you were granted asylum;

  • You continue to meet the definition of a refugee, or to be the spouse or child of a refugee;

  • You have not firmly resettled in any foreign country;

  • Your grant of asylum has not been terminated;

  • You are admissible to the United States for lawful permanent residence or eligible for a waiver of inadmissibility or other form of relief; and

What documents do I need to submit?

The person who was granted asylum is called the principal applicant. If you are the principal applicant, you should submit the following documentation and evidence to apply for a Green Card:

  • Proof of your grant of asylum (such as a copy of the letter, decision of an immigration judge, or Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record that shows the date you were granted asylum);

  • Evidence of one-year physical presence in the U.S.;

  • Two passport-style photographs;

  • Copy of your government-issued identity document with photograph;

  • Copy of your birth certificate (if available);

  • Copy of your passport page with nonimmigrant visa (if available);

  • Copy of your passport page with admission or parole stamp (issued by a U.S. immigration officer) (if available);

  • Certified police and court records of criminal charges, arrests, or convictions (if applicable); and

Can my relatives also obtain permanent residency in the United States?

Yes. Immediate relatives (spouse or child) may also obtain permanent residency if they meet the following requirements:

  • They properly filed Form I-485:

  • They are currently the principal applicant’s spouse or child and the principal applicant still meets the definition of a refugee;

  • They are physically present in the United States at the time you file your Form I-485;

  • They have been physically present in the United States for at least one year since you were granted asylum as a derivative;

  • Their grant of asylum has not been terminated;

  • They are admissible to the United States for lawful permanent residence or eligible for a waiver of inadmissibility or other form of relief; and

  • They merit the favorable exercise of discretion.

What documents do I need to submit for my relatives to obtain a green card?

submit the following documentation and evidence:

  • Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, with the correct fee or with Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver;

  • Copy of documentation showing your relationship to the principal applicant, such as a marriage certificate, birth certificate, or adoption decree;

  • Evidence of your asylum status (such as a copy of the letter, decision of an immigration judge,  Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record, or approved I-730 Petition filed on your behalf that shows the date you were granted asylum as a derivative);

  • Evidence of one-year physical presence in the U.S.;

  • Two passport-style photographs;

  • Copy of your government-issued identity document with photograph;

  • Copy of your birth certificate (if available);

  • Copy of your passport  page with your nonimmigrant visa (if available);

  • Copy of your passport page with admission  or parole stamp (issued by a U.S. immigration officer) (if available);

  • Form I-693, Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record (you may submit this form together with Form I-485 or later, for example, when USCIS requests it or in person at your interview, if any);

  • Certified police and court records of criminal charges, arrests, or convictions (if applicable); and

  • Form I-602, Application by Refugee for Waiver of Grounds of Excludability (if applicable).

If you have additional questions or require further information or assistance, please contact us. Follow us on InstagramTwitterFacebookLinkedIn and Tumblr, for up-to-date immigration news. Please note that past results do not guarantee future outcomes. 


Rasoulpour Torregoza is the law firm for immigrants, by immigrants. We are founded on the motto of LegalEase: we do away with the legal jargon and make law easy to understand, so you can focus on what’s important to you – going for your American Dream.
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