General

News Alert: TSA reminds travelers of REAL ID identification requirements

News Alert: TSA reminds travelers of REAL ID identification requirements

The REAL ID Act, passed by Congress in 2005, sets standards for the issuance of sources of identification, such as driver's licenses. The Act established minimum security standards for license issuance and production and prohibits Federal agencies from accepting for certain purposes driver’s licenses and identification cards from states not meeting the Act’s minimum standards. Enforcement begins in 18 months at all U.S. airport checkpoints. Find out how this development may affect you.

Where can I work with an Employment Authorization Document (EAD)? Can an employer not hire me because I am not a Legal Permanent Resident or a U.S. Citizen?

Where can I work with an Employment Authorization Document (EAD)? Can an employer not hire me because I am not a Legal Permanent Resident or a U.S. Citizen?

The employment authorization document (EAD) is one way to prove that one is allowed to work in the United States for a specific time period. If you have an EAD and an employer refused to hire you or interview you because you do not have a green card, the employer’s conduct may have been unlawful.

Form Update: USCIS Revised Form I-539 and New Form I-539A

Form Update: USCIS Revised Form I-539 and New Form I-539A

Updated: March 8, 2019

USCIS is set to publish revised Form I-539 Application to Extend or Change Nonimmigrant Status and new form I-539A, which replaces form Supplement A, on March 11, 2019. Find out what’s changed and what’s new.

FAQs: What is the Employment Authorization Document (EAD)?

FAQs:  What is the Employment Authorization Document (EAD)?

U.S. employers must check to make sure all employees, regardless of citizenship or national origin, are allowed to work in the United States. Having an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) is one way to prove that you are allowed to work in the United States for a specific time period. Read our FAQs about the employment authorization document (work permit).

Will the 2018 government shutdown affect my immigration application?

Will the 2018 government shutdown affect my immigration application?

UPDATED: January 3, 2019

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) fee-funded services remain unaffected by the shutdown. However, Immigration Court (EOIR) is closed except for detained cases. ICE enforcement and removal operations will continue, and ICE attorneys are working on the detained docket. Assume that check-ins are proceeding as per usual. The Department of State is still providing passport and visa services. U.S. district courts are all reacting differently in different jurisdictions. Contact the relevant court to see how the shutdown may affect your case.

@AILANational Know Your Rights Flyer for Green Card Holders

@AILANational Know Your Rights Flyer for Green Card Holders

The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), the national association of over 15,000 immigration lawyers and practitioners, who represent families seeking permanent residence for their close family members; U.S. businesses seeking global talent; foreign students, entertainers, artists, and athletes; as well as asylum seekers, often on a pro bono basis, has released a Know-Your-Rights Flyer for Green Card holders detained at a port of entry.

FAQs on USCIS Implementation of New Policy on Notices to Appear (NTA)

FAQs on USCIS Implementation of New Policy on Notices to Appear (NTA)

Beginning October 1, 2018, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will begin implementing the June 28 Updated Guidance for the Referral of Cases and Issuance of Notices to Appear (NTAs) in Cases Involving Inadmissible and Deportable Aliens Policy Memorandum (PM) (PDF, 140 KB), which affects green card applicants applying for permanent residency and individuals who are applying to change or extend their nonimmigrant visa status. Read our FAQs here.