Asylum

What happens during an asylum interview? What questions will I be asked?

What happens during an asylum interview? What questions will I be asked?

In order to be granted asylum, an applicant must demonstrate that they are a refugee. A refugee is someone who has fled from their country and cannot return because they have a well-founded fear of persecution based on religion, race, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group. In the United States, the affirmative asylum process includes a paper application that must be filed with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and an in-person interview. Find out what happens during an asylum interview.

Can I still apply for asylum? Judge blocks Trump asylum ban

Can I still apply for asylum? Judge blocks Trump asylum ban

On November 9, 2018, President Trump issued a proclamation barring any individuals entering without inspection from seeking asylum. Ten days later, a Federal Judge issued a temporary injunction blocking the administration from implementing the new policy, saying it likely violated federal law on asylum eligibility. Learn more about this new development.

What's new on the Updated Form I-765 Application for Employment Authorization?

What's new on the Updated Form I-765 Application for Employment Authorization?

On July 16, 2018, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) updated Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization. The form is now seven pages long and includes new questions about previous arrests and convictions. Learn more about who is affected and what documents are required by USCIS.

AILA Video: An Update on Family Separation and Family Detention

AILA Video: An Update on Family Separation and Family Detention

On this AILA Quicktake Video, Director of the Immigration Justice Campaign Karen Lucas discusses the injunction issued by a court in California and explains the Immigration Justice Campaign's involvement in the family separation crisis on the border, with American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), Communication Specialist, Tessa Wiseman. 

Trump administration's Executive Order on separation of refugee families at the border

Trump administration's Executive Order on separation of refugee families at the border

On June 20, 2018, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that ends the administration’s policy of separating migrant families crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, abandoning the president’s previous stance that only Congress can fix the problem. Read the Executive Order here.

@AILANational Response to Attorney General Decision on Domestic & Gang Violence Asylum Claims

@AILANational Response to Attorney General Decision on Domestic & Gang Violence Asylum Claims

On June 11, 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a precedent decision in a case that he referred to himself. In the decision, he vacated the Board of Immigration Appeal's (BIA) decision in Matter of A- B and announced that in his view, domestic violence victims and other victims of crimes perpetrated by private, non-government actors do not generally qualify for asylum. Read the response from the leadership of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) and the implications of this decision on refugees and asylum-seekers.