Know Your Rights

Know Your Rights: What happens during an ICE immigration raid? What can I do?

Know Your Rights: What happens during an ICE immigration raid? What can I do?

Media outlets have recently reported on the Trump administration’s planned Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids targeting immigrants with final orders of removal. To help immigrants and their families, we have provided above information on how to protect yourself and your family.

Where can I work with an Employment Authorization Document (EAD)? Can an employer not hire me because I am not a Legal Permanent Resident or a U.S. Citizen?

Where can I work with an Employment Authorization Document (EAD)? Can an employer not hire me because I am not a Legal Permanent Resident or a U.S. Citizen?

The employment authorization document (EAD) is one way to prove that one is allowed to work in the United States for a specific time period. If you have an EAD and an employer refused to hire you or interview you because you do not have a green card, the employer’s conduct may have been unlawful.

FAQs: Immigration Options for Survivors of Domestic Violence

FAQs: Immigration Options for Survivors of Domestic Violence

As the holidays approach, it is important to remember that this a time in the U.S. when there have historically been spikes in incidents of domestic violence. Noncitizens in the U.S. who are also experiencing intimate partner violence may feel that their immigration status is an additional barrier to leaving their partner or getting help. While many factors make it extremely hard to leave a relationship, it is important to know that there are immigration options available if you are an immigrant and this blog post discusses generally some of them.  

@AILANational Know Your Rights Flyer for Green Card Holders

@AILANational Know Your Rights Flyer for Green Card Holders

The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), the national association of over 15,000 immigration lawyers and practitioners, who represent families seeking permanent residence for their close family members; U.S. businesses seeking global talent; foreign students, entertainers, artists, and athletes; as well as asylum seekers, often on a pro bono basis, has released a Know-Your-Rights Flyer for Green Card holders detained at a port of entry.

DHS wants to monitor social media accounts of all immigrants - including naturalized U.S. citizens

DHS wants to monitor social media accounts of all immigrants - including naturalized U.S. citizens

On September 18, 2017, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), announced its intention to expand its database containing immigrant information ("Alien Files" or "A Files") to include social media information of all immigrants in the country—even green card holders and naturalized U.S. citizens—a dramatic ramping up of surveillance of virtually anyone in the United States who is not a U.S. citizen by birth.

DHS on Safety and Enforcement During Hurricane Irma

DHS on Safety and Enforcement During Hurricane Irma

On September 6, 2017, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a statement regarding safety and enforcement during Hurricane Irma, assuring the public that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) highest priorities – as they were with Hurricane Harvey – are to promote life-saving and life-sustaining activities, the safe evacuation of people who are leaving the impacted area, the maintenance of public order, the prevention of the loss of property to the extent possible, and the speedy recovery of the region.

Can border agents search my phone or laptop?

Can border agents search my phone or laptop?

Can border agents search my phone, laptop and other electronic devices?
With tighter security and screening at borders and ports, this is a question we get a lot. Ordinarily, the police need a warrant in order to conduct a search of your person and your belongings. However, at borders and airports, agents have broader authority to conduct routine searches of people and their belongings that police on the street would not have. For "non-routine" searches (e.g. strip search), agents must reasonably suspect that the person is involved in some criminal activity.